Humanities

 

And May the Visuals be Ever in Your Favor: An Analysis of Visual Metaphors in The Hunger Games

Anna Sprecher

The Hunger Games novel by Suzanne Collins includes numerous symolic images throughout to shed light on societal problems. This paper argues that readers accept these symbols readily because society responds well to visual representations, thanks to the constant flood of visual media.

 

Listen to the Story: Banksy, Tyler the Creator, and Nihilism in Urban Artistic Expression

Duri Long

Art, as an expression of feelings, worldviews, and personal beliefs, is a reflection of our environment and how we interact with it. In this way, urban art such as rap music and graffiti can serve as a lens through which we are able to examine the state of the urban environment.

 

Staring into Destruction: Analyzing the Association between Sight, Desire, and Death

Leland Tabares

In Salome, Oscar Wilde expresses a dangerous relationship between sight and sexual desire that leads to death.  Throughout the play, the male characters look upon the females with a sense of voyeurism, stimulating a sensual desire for the other.  In the same way, the female characters re

 

So Long Scantrons!

Kelsey Smart

Technology has undoubtedly affected the higher education system in many ways over the past decade.

 

Food, Sex & Violence: A Decolonizing Feminism in Caribbean Literature

Jon W. O'Neill

In Edwidge Danticat’s Breath, Eyes, Memory (1998) and Jamaica Kincaid’s Autobiography of My Mother (1995), cooking and eating are acts that describe for us the conflicts and confusions of forming a national, familial or sexual identity in the (neo-)colonized, or decolonizing, Ca

 

Moral Philosophy and the Dialogic Tradition: Izaak Walton's The Complete Angler

Taylor Hewett

There is no doubt that the defining religious, political, and economic framework of seventeenth-century England had its influences on the Angler.

 

Quite Useless: Truth, Art, and Life in Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray

Sarah Huener

In his examination of art in human form, Oscar Wilde ultimately concludes that art is not a means of striving for Absolute Truth, as Plato describes Form to be. Wilde’s choice of a man as his object of analysis is no coincidence; for him, the human soul itself is Form.

 

Allusions as Web-Building Vehicles in V for Vendetta

Orvis Evans, Michael Foote, Ross McDonald

Some works call out to readers with an invitation to play an active role in the construction of the text's meaning.

 

Joke’s on You, Interpreters of “Bartleby”

Zeke Saber

Some mysteries weren’t meant to be solved, but that doesn’t stop literary critics from trying to dissect Herman Melville’s “Bartleby, the Scrivener.” Saber argues that Melville intentionally prevents concrete interpretation of his short story through complex linguistics and multiple layers of for

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