Follow the Leader: Partisanship in the Processing of Political Speech

Patrick Hahn

Voters in the United States are inundated with political speech during campaign season, and it is important to consider the ways voters evaluate this speech.

 

False Assumptions: Why Title IX is not to Blame for Changes in Men’s Athletics

Angell Wescott

The purpose of this paper is to disprove the arguments of those who believe that Title IX negatively impacts men’s athletics and explain how this information is particularly important to lawmakers and those determining how to distribute funds among athletic programs.

 

Concussions: A Career-Changing Collision

Allen Champagne

Concussions in sports are a pressing topic in today's sports-obsessed culture. Football games have numerous injuries, and concussions are especially prevalent among athletes who play the sport. This paper examines the short- and long-term effects on football players who receive concussions.

 

The Architect and the Epicure

Sean Mattio

While some may find a comparison of the architect and the epicure unusual, the work of artists such as Marie-Antoine Carême, Adolf Loos, and Kazuko Okakura make such an analogy both plausible and interesting by giving us a set of intellectual tools to trace a connection between food and architect

 

Pharmacogenomics: A Review of its Objectives, Successes, and Limitations

Hannah Shaw

Pharmacogenomics is the study of how a person’s genes affects their body’s response to drugs. While current medical drug therapies tend to treat all patients as if they were the same, differences in one’s genome can determine whether a treatment will be effective, ineffective, or even harmful.

 

Race Against Time: The Development of Antibiotic Resistance

Caleb Wooley

Antibiotic treatments have been around since the discovery of penicillin in 1928. For the last 70 years, antibiotics have treated numerous people and prevented severe outbreaks of bacterial infections.

 

Can We Grow Replacement Organs? A Survey of Current Literature

Connor Karr

Although written a century ago, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is not far off from the ideas some scientists have for modern medicine. Regenerative medicine, also known as tissue engineering, could be one of the most powerful medical fields in the future.

 

Lara Croft and Gaming: Feminism in a Hyper-Masculine Industry

Lydia McInnes

Gaming’s bravest (and bustiest) archaeologist crashed back onto the scene in 2013 after nearly five years since her last video game appearance.

 

Superhero Popularity in Past and Present America

Talia Smart

The industry of superhero films has ballooned over the past ten years or so, expanding into massive franchises under the leadership of longtime comic book producers Marvel and D.C. Comics and drawing larger audiences than ever.

 

The Professional Importance of Grammar and How it Should be Taught

Nicole Frederick

Over the years, language learning has developed with increasing disregard toward proper grammar. Rather than focusing on syntax, educators are increasingly concerned with language fluency, which stems from a communicative language teaching approach rather than a traditional syntactical approach.

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