Cycle 4, 2013

emblem of South Korea
 

Is the Law Always Right?: A Study of the Statute of Limitations and the Police System Through “The Three Unresolved Criminal Cases”

Elizabeth Han

In the last decades of the twentieth century, South Korea was shaken by three distinct series of shocking crimes. The first began on September 15, 1986. It was a rainy day when a woman of seventy-one was found dead, her hands tied up with stockings and her face covered with her underwear.

Vincent van Zeijst ICC Headquarters
 

Libya and the International Criminal Court: A Case Study for Shared Responsibility

Christian Rodriguez

Among the global challenges presented to the international community in the aftermath of the Second World War was a need to bring to justice individuals accused of the most heinous international crimes.

Syrian Refugees in Lebanon 2012
 

Words as Weapons

E Brawley

In only two short years, the Syrian War has conjured some of the most complicated civil and worldwide conflict of the twenty-first century.

Portal da Copa do Mundo de 2014
 

Assessing the Long-term Economic Impacts of the World Cup as Mega-sport Event

Yundong Liu

By comparing the short-term and long-term economic impacts of the World Cup upon countries that host the spectacular event, this article will qualitatively demonstrate that the World Cup has positive impacts in the long run.

Fumble tackle, by AJ Guel
 

Warfare vs. Fanfare: The National Football League’s Concussion Crisis and a Proposal for Reform

Destinee Grove

My view most resembles that of the neurological scholars. While I don’t share all their views, I concur that substantial modifications need to be introduced to the NFL to improve player protection.

 

Revolutionary Ideology in the Outcomes of Social Revolutions

Jordan Elliott

I contend that, although the preceding government and society are significant in causing a revolution and creating revolutionaries, the ideological mindset of the revolutionary group is itself a major factor in determining the outcome of the revolution.

 

What is art: An Objective Definition vs. a Functional Definition

Mikala Smith

The question "What is art?" has been asked for generations, but it is important to consider art's functionality rather than its definition. This paper explores scholarship on the issue of art.

 

UNC Campus Crime Analysis: Working to Recognize and Reduce

Sierra Lyda

Universities across the nation constantly strive to create a safe, friendly environment for college students to thrive in, UNC-Chapel Hill being no exception.

 

Beyond the Medicine: Reducing Breast Cancer Deaths in African-American Women

Sarah Chen

This paper will explore a solution to reduce the number of breast cancer deaths in African-American women. African-American women are equally as likely as white women to get breast cancer. However, African-American women are 41% more likely than white women to die from breast cancer.

 

Social hub or social flub? An analysis of social interaction in dormitories with differing architecture.

Adam Bock

Many different factors affect the experiences college students have in their residence halls, and one of these factors is the distance between students.  The goal of this study was to determine if functional distance had a different impact than physical distance on residents, and if so, a seconda

 

Inclusion is the Answer

Ashlyn Hill

Children with Down syndrome need to be included more often in social settings like the classroom despite their learning and physical disabilities. I will explain several strategies for inclusion.

 

And May the Visuals be Ever in Your Favor: An Analysis of Visual Metaphors in The Hunger Games

Anna Sprecher

The Hunger Games novel by Suzanne Collins includes numerous symolic images throughout to shed light on societal problems. This paper argues that readers accept these symbols readily because society responds well to visual representations, thanks to the constant flood of visual media.

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