Schizophrenia: A Beautiful Fight

Julia Berkelhammer, Angel Cockerham, Michelle Kasprak, Alyssa Tedder, and Taylor Warren
 

So Long Scantrons!

Kelsey Smart

Technology has undoubtedly affected the higher education system in many ways over the past decade.

 

Can We Grow Replacement Organs? A Survey of Current Literature

Connor Karr

Although written a century ago, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is not far off from the ideas some scientists have for modern medicine. Regenerative medicine, also known as tissue engineering, could be one of the most powerful medical fields in the future.

 

Colored by Passion: The Political-Poetical Intersect in the Life and Work of Pablo Neruda

Erin Becker

Pablo Neruda began his career as an apolitical love poet and ended it as an outspoken advocate for engaged art and the Communist cause.

 

Competitive Youth Sports and the Rise of Overuse, Burnout, and Career-Ending Injury

Ginny Moses

Youth sports should be a healthy outlet for children, but the hypercompetitive environment of organized sports puts children’s minds and bodies at risk of overuse, burnout, and career-ending injury. Thirty percent of children involved in organized sports will sustain a serious injury.

 

UNC Campus Crime Analysis: Working to Recognize and Reduce

Sierra Lyda

Universities across the nation constantly strive to create a safe, friendly environment for college students to thrive in, UNC-Chapel Hill being no exception.

 

Malaria: Preventable, Curable, Going Nowhere Fast

Madeline Pliska

Malaria has largely been defeated around the world, but there are still thousands of people who die from the disease every year in sub-Saharan Africa. Cultural perceptions about malaria are preventing the elimination of the disease, which is caused by Anopheles mosquitoes.

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