Race Against Time: The Development of Antibiotic Resistance

Caleb Wooley

Antibiotic treatments have been around since the discovery of penicillin in 1928. For the last 70 years, antibiotics have treated numerous people and prevented severe outbreaks of bacterial infections.

 

Rebirth Melodies: Music’s Instrumental Hold in the Rebuilding Efforts of New Orleans after Katrina

Flavia Crovesi

This article assesses the work done by charities and local music venues to revitalize the musical culture in New Orleans in the years following the devastation left in the wake of Hurricane Katrina.

 

Feeding Global Warming: Assessing the Impact of Agriculture on Climate Change

Emma Layman

This essay examines the ways in which agricultural practices have influenced global climate change.

 

Joke’s on You, Interpreters of “Bartleby”

Zeke Saber

Some mysteries weren’t meant to be solved, but that doesn’t stop literary critics from trying to dissect Herman Melville’s “Bartleby, the Scrivener.” Saber argues that Melville intentionally prevents concrete interpretation of his short story through complex linguistics and multiple layers of for

 

The Professional Importance of Grammar and How it Should be Taught

Nicole Frederick

Over the years, language learning has developed with increasing disregard toward proper grammar. Rather than focusing on syntax, educators are increasingly concerned with language fluency, which stems from a communicative language teaching approach rather than a traditional syntactical approach.

 

Concussions: A Career-Changing Collision

Allen Champagne

Concussions in sports are a pressing topic in today's sports-obsessed culture. Football games have numerous injuries, and concussions are especially prevalent among athletes who play the sport. This paper examines the short- and long-term effects on football players who receive concussions.

 

Schizophrenia: A Beautiful Fight

Julia Berkelhammer, Angel Cockerham, Michelle Kasprak, Alyssa Tedder, and Taylor Warren
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