The Wrong Diagnosis: Why Infectious Disease Continues to Undermine Africa’s Development

Chris Rota

Infectious disease is a part of the human existence, a necessary experience which is shared by people from all walks of life. In the developed world, illnesses such as the common cold come and go with relatively little impact on the people they touch.

 

Moral Philosophy and the Dialogic Tradition: Izaak Walton's The Complete Angler

Taylor Hewett

There is no doubt that the defining religious, political, and economic framework of seventeenth-century England had its influences on the Angler.

 

The Energy Source of Tomorrow: Benefits of Nuclear Fusion Power

Ivan Pogrebnyak

In the search for sources of energy, discussions of nuclear fusion power as an option have often been seen as unrealistic, overshadowed by the viability of nuclear fission.

 

Joke’s on You, Interpreters of “Bartleby”

Zeke Saber

Some mysteries weren’t meant to be solved, but that doesn’t stop literary critics from trying to dissect Herman Melville’s “Bartleby, the Scrivener.” Saber argues that Melville intentionally prevents concrete interpretation of his short story through complex linguistics and multiple layers of for

 

Quite Useless: Truth, Art, and Life in Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray

Sarah Huener

In his examination of art in human form, Oscar Wilde ultimately concludes that art is not a means of striving for Absolute Truth, as Plato describes Form to be. Wilde’s choice of a man as his object of analysis is no coincidence; for him, the human soul itself is Form.

 

Wait, You Stormed Franklin Street! Why? The Social and Psychological Motivations of UNC Sports Fans

Kristine Thompson

Sports are a distinct subculture in the United States that encompass diverse populations and affect the lives of millions of people.  This article examines the social and psychological factors that influence sport fandom and presents a case study of the motivations of fans at the University of No

Top