Staring into Destruction: Analyzing the Association between Sight, Desire, and Death

Leland Tabares

In Salome, Oscar Wilde expresses a dangerous relationship between sight and sexual desire that leads to death.  Throughout the play, the male characters look upon the females with a sense of voyeurism, stimulating a sensual desire for the other.  In the same way, the female characters re


Allusions as Web-Building Vehicles in V for Vendetta

Orvis Evans, Michael Foote, Ross McDonald

Some works call out to readers with an invitation to play an active role in the construction of the text's meaning.


Colored by Passion: The Political-Poetical Intersect in the Life and Work of Pablo Neruda

Erin Becker

Pablo Neruda began his career as an apolitical love poet and ended it as an outspoken advocate for engaged art and the Communist cause.


So You Think You Can Multitask?

Kelsey Mays, Katie Pazur, Hank Samuels

Multitasking, contrary to popular belief, is becoming more and more of a problem in today's college classrooms. As the prevalence of personal technology becomes more obvious, so do the consequences associated with it.


Quite Useless: Truth, Art, and Life in Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray

Sarah Huener

In his examination of art in human form, Oscar Wilde ultimately concludes that art is not a means of striving for Absolute Truth, as Plato describes Form to be. Wilde’s choice of a man as his object of analysis is no coincidence; for him, the human soul itself is Form.


Can We Grow Replacement Organs? A Survey of Current Literature

Connor Karr

Although written a century ago, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is not far off from the ideas some scientists have for modern medicine. Regenerative medicine, also known as tissue engineering, could be one of the most powerful medical fields in the future.