Competitive Youth Sports and the Rise of Overuse, Burnout, and Career-Ending Injury

Ginny Moses

Youth sports should be a healthy outlet for children, but the hypercompetitive environment of organized sports puts children’s minds and bodies at risk of overuse, burnout, and career-ending injury. Thirty percent of children involved in organized sports will sustain a serious injury.

 

Listen to the Story: Banksy, Tyler the Creator, and Nihilism in Urban Artistic Expression

Duri Long

Art, as an expression of feelings, worldviews, and personal beliefs, is a reflection of our environment and how we interact with it. In this way, urban art such as rap music and graffiti can serve as a lens through which we are able to examine the state of the urban environment.

 

Follow the Leader: Partisanship in the Processing of Political Speech

Patrick Hahn

Voters in the United States are inundated with political speech during campaign season, and it is important to consider the ways voters evaluate this speech.

 

Malaria: Preventable, Curable, Going Nowhere Fast

Madeline Pliska

Malaria has largely been defeated around the world, but there are still thousands of people who die from the disease every year in sub-Saharan Africa. Cultural perceptions about malaria are preventing the elimination of the disease, which is caused by Anopheles mosquitoes.

 

Marketing Morally in the 21st Century: An Inevitable Intervention

Max Satter

Big data has revolutionized marketing, giving businesses access to huge amounts of information about consumers. This information can be used to create targeted advertising that helps advertisers achieve higher profits and provides consumers with relevant advertising.

 

The Architect and the Epicure

Sean Mattio

While some may find a comparison of the architect and the epicure unusual, the work of artists such as Marie-Antoine Carême, Adolf Loos, and Kazuko Okakura make such an analogy both plausible and interesting by giving us a set of intellectual tools to trace a connection between food and architect

 

Race Against Time: The Development of Antibiotic Resistance

Caleb Wooley

Antibiotic treatments have been around since the discovery of penicillin in 1928. For the last 70 years, antibiotics have treated numerous people and prevented severe outbreaks of bacterial infections.

 

“Where's the Love?”: The Stigmatization of Women with HIV/AIDS in South Africa

Ryan Woodard

The stigmatization of women with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) / acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in South Africa is a key factor to isolating them from the rest of society and undermining the care and treatment made available to them.

 

The Wrong Diagnosis: Why Infectious Disease Continues to Undermine Africa’s Development

Chris Rota

Infectious disease is a part of the human existence, a necessary experience which is shared by people from all walks of life. In the developed world, illnesses such as the common cold come and go with relatively little impact on the people they touch.

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