The Architect and the Epicure

Sean Mattio

While some may find a comparison of the architect and the epicure unusual, the work of artists such as Marie-Antoine Carême, Adolf Loos, and Kazuko Okakura make such an analogy both plausible and interesting by giving us a set of intellectual tools to trace a connection between food and architect

 

Looking @ the Trolls Behind the Screen: An Analysis of the Factors Affecting Everyday Sadism through Trolling on the Internet

Jamie Ramos

Cyber trolling is a known manifestation of everyday sadism. A study of over 500 internet users was conducted to determine why the internet allows for easier expression of sadistic behaviors.

 

False Assumptions: Why Title IX is not to Blame for Changes in Men’s Athletics

Angell Wescott

The purpose of this paper is to disprove the arguments of those who believe that Title IX negatively impacts men’s athletics and explain how this information is particularly important to lawmakers and those determining how to distribute funds among athletic programs.

 

The Unknown Link: Epigenetics, Metabolism, and Nutrition

Nafiah Enayet

The number of individuals suffering from obesity in America is skyrocketing. This article examines a possible tool to help combat obesity, which is a national health crisis that contributes to serious medical issues like heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.

 

Moral Philosophy and the Dialogic Tradition: Izaak Walton's The Complete Angler

Taylor Hewett

There is no doubt that the defining religious, political, and economic framework of seventeenth-century England had its influences on the Angler.

 

What is Love? Understanding The Process of Human Mate Selection

Stephanie Liffland

When humans experience attraction, most people are not aware of myriad biological processes driving their desire. This paper seeks to synthesize different research on the processes behind human mate selection.

 

Quite Useless: Truth, Art, and Life in Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray

Sarah Huener

In his examination of art in human form, Oscar Wilde ultimately concludes that art is not a means of striving for Absolute Truth, as Plato describes Form to be. Wilde’s choice of a man as his object of analysis is no coincidence; for him, the human soul itself is Form.

 

Can We Grow Replacement Organs? A Survey of Current Literature

Connor Karr

Although written a century ago, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is not far off from the ideas some scientists have for modern medicine. Regenerative medicine, also known as tissue engineering, could be one of the most powerful medical fields in the future.

 

Colored by Passion: The Political-Poetical Intersect in the Life and Work of Pablo Neruda

Erin Becker

Pablo Neruda began his career as an apolitical love poet and ended it as an outspoken advocate for engaged art and the Communist cause.

 

Rebirth Melodies: Music’s Instrumental Hold in the Rebuilding Efforts of New Orleans after Katrina

Flavia Crovesi

This article assesses the work done by charities and local music venues to revitalize the musical culture in New Orleans in the years following the devastation left in the wake of Hurricane Katrina.

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